Danish folk music sound at Larsen Strings

Yesterday at Larsen Strings, the sound of local folk music resonated through our facilities: we had the visit of the famous Danish fiddler Harald Haugaard and one of his musical partners: Kirstine Elise Pedersen (cello). The two musicians came by to optimize the setup of their instruments.

Lthl og HH

We soon found out that trying strings with these musicians was mainly about contributing to their mutual collaboration. They fully understood the necessity of supplying one another with sound and to truly discover the sound characteristics of the strings they were playing together between every string shift. For Harald and Kirstine music is not just about the individual player but much more about creating artistic symbioses between players.Kirstine Elise Pedersen

As a first step we tried strings with Kirstine. Kirstine plays a modern German cello from Krattenmacher and the instrument was set up with A and D Soloist strong and G and C Magnacore medium. She felt that on her cello, the D string could not bring the same sound quality as the other strings of the setup. It was somehow muffled and covered. We changed the two upper strings to a Magnacore D strong and Magnacore A medium. It brought extra brilliance to the upper registers and a perfect balance to the instrument.

Harald and Kirstine

Subsequently, we moved on to the violin. Harald Haugaard plays a Klotz violin from Mittenwald. Harald explained that the Larsen Original for violin brings to him the sound characteristics needed for his music. The E string, however, was a challenge for him. Harald was looking for a more powerful E-string with a brighter sound. We gave him the golden experience. The Larsen original E-gold string solved his demand by bringing extra brilliance while still providing the characteristic structure of the violin sound.

It was very nice to get a first-hand experience of the freedom of playing that Harald and Kirstine have. Thank you both for your visit and hope to meet again soon.

 

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Testing Magnacore cello strings with Simon Morris and Larsen Strings

Here is the first in a series of many videos to come where we test strings with musicians, violin-makers and dealers. Please enjoy this video made at Beare’s in London. We hope it will bring you additional insights about the feeling, projection and sound of our strings.

Working with you to discover the soul of your instrument: We couldn’t do it without you!

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How to recognize a Larsen string?

How to tell the difference between Larsen strings once they are out of their bags?

Silk colour

Since the very first Larsen Cello A string came on the market, the yellow silk with blue thread symbolizes Larsen Strings.

However, to differentiate between the different string models and tension levels, Larsen Strings uses different silk colours, especially at the peg-end so it is possible to see whether a violinist plays a Tzigane medium or a Virtuoso® strong. To identify a Larsen string, please consult Larsen Strings A/S Silk colours.

Ball colours

Larsen Strings has a special way of differentiating between the first, second, third and fourth string. Where most producers use silk colours, Larsen Strings uses balls of different materials.

Larsen Strings I (Violin E, Viola A and Cello A) is made of brass. It has a rich golden colour.

Larsen Ball I Brass

Larsen Strings II (Violin A, Viola D, and Cello D) is made of chrome. It has a bright silver colour.

Larsen ball II Chrome

 

Larsen Strings III (Violin D, Viola G and Cello G) is made of copper. It has a reddish golden colour.

Larsen ball III Copper

 

Larsen Strings IV (Violin G, Viola C and Cello C) is black.

Larsen ball IV Black

 

Crown cello strings by Larsen

If you play the Crown strings, you will find out that all balls are made of brass. Crown, a brand acquired by Larsen Strings, has retained its original colour codes. To identify Crown, please consult Larsen Strings A/S Silk Colours.

Ball colours and Silk colours

Some people like the way we use balls to differentiate the strings, others find it difficult. We tend to believe that long-term it is easier to remember the ball colours than having a long list of colour codes when differentiating between the first, second, third and fourth string.

Please share your thoughts about balls and silk colours with us…

Because we couldn’t do it without you.

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