From Sønderborg in Southern Denmark, to you

When our strings leave Sønderborg in Denmark, they travel to all parts of the world, so you can get a hold of them and use them for your musical activities. To help these strings find their way to you as a musician, we have developed a network of partners who can meet your needs in your local area. Among many highly valued partners, we have had the honor of working together with GEWA for many years. Building a personal relationship to GEWA’s employees is an important step in securing good communication to all the Larsen players in Germany, Austria, France, Italy and the Netherlands.

Therefore, we sometimes invite some of GEWA’s employees and the time had come for Simone Messner to visit us. Simone, who takes care of Social Media & Network at GEWA, was interested in learning more about the mysterious world of string making.

During her visit, we showed Simone how strings are made, from the core to the final string. The first step is to prepare the core of a string. At Larsen Strings, we work with three types of cores: solid steel core, synthetic core and multi-stranded steel core. When the cores are ready, they enter our machinery to be loaded with different layers of materials. Most importantly, our specialized employees and machinery supervise the manufacturing process meticulously in order to support the highly consistent quality of Larsen Strings. After a final quality test, the strings receive their silk colors and are then ready to be packed and shipped to you.

Understanding, not all the secrets, but some of the secrets behind the making of a string is very important for GEWA’s employees, who have the difficult job of communicating the special qualities of Larsen’s strings to their markets. But most of all, what really matters is for us, the people behind Larsen Strings and the people behind GEWA’s communication, to get to know each other better. All while discussing strings we improved our mutual understanding, thus creating strong relations.

It’s all about people.

Thank you to Simone Messner from GEWA for stopping by. We couldn’t do it without you.

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