Dieter Göltl and Thomas Zwieg

How to make an instrument sing

Dieter Göltl, assistant solo cellist at the NDR Symphony Orchestra in Hamburg came by with his Sacconi cello from 1926.

Over the years, Larsen Strings has enjoyed very good collaboration with the cello section of the NDR Symphony Orchestra, and Mr. Göltl who had noticed the enthusiasm of his colleagues and the result of our efforts with their instruments was now ready to meet us.

Mr. Göltl had been using the same string set-up for many years and was quite satisfied with it. However, he remembered that his instrument some 15 years earlier had a distinctly more open sound and feeling. At  that time when he had just acquired the instrument, it was in a very bad condition. His violinmaker replaced the bass bar and after this the instrument stayed somehow closed and oppressed.

When Mr. Göltl came to Larsen Strings the instrument was still beautiful but not perfectly balanced. The G and D strings were weaker than the higher and lower strings. Furthermore, Mr. Göltl used a dampening rubber ring under the A string at the bridge. At the end of our session the Sacconi cello had four Larsen Magnacore strings, and the rubber ring under the A string had become redundant. Mr. Göltl could suddenly recognize his instrument from 15 years earlier; he recognized the sound and feeling of the instrument. The instrument had regained its freedom and it was able to breathe. When being played by its owner it was actually singing.

Thank you Mr. Göltl for your visit. We hope to hear from you again soon.

 

If you want to know more about the Larsen Magnacore strings, please visit our homepage for factsheet, testimonials, etc.

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Published by

Marie Girard

Marie Girard Skilled Musician & String Advisor MSc in Economics and Business Administration - Diplom Musician LARSEN STRINGS A/S

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